oldmouse home
oldmouse blog minis
Engelbart's first mouse
Telefunken "Rollkugel"
Orbit X-Y Ball Tracker
Engelbart's NLS mouse
Mystery wheel mouse
Hawley Mouse House
Alto I [2]
Xerox 8010 Star [2]
VisiOn GUI
Mouse Systems
Hawley Mark II X063X
Microsoft bus mouse
Microsoft serial mouse
NeXT Computer
Hawley DEC mouse
Atari ST mouse
Commodore 1350 Mouse
Microsoft 'dove bar' mouse
USB (Universal Serial Bus)
Microsoft PC 97 standard


Orbit x-y Ball Tracker Xerox Star Mystery mouse - wheels instead of a ball Hawley Mark II X063X Lisa mouse Gibson light pen Logitech P7 Mouse Systems Optical M1 Mac M0100 serial Tablet with stylus Microsoft 'Dove bar' Internet scroll mouse Kensington Trackball notebook Trackball joystick 2-button mouse scrolling 2-button mouse NeXT mouse Kidz mouse Macintosh mouse




Hawley Mark II X063X Mouses

In an undated ad, Hawley Mouse House boasts about inventing its first digital mouse in 1972. (Stanford Making the Macintosh) The Alto I mouse substantiates this claim to fame by its prominent embossing of the name Hawley alongside Xerox on its innards. It wasn't until 1983, however, that Jack Hawley produced his own mouse, the Mark II X063X, with his company name only and the copyright year emblazoned inside.

The Hawley mouse looks industrial with its sparse little block design and homely black plug, compared to the contemporary Xerox Star mouse. The bottom of the Hawley Mark II is reminiscent of the Alto's mouse except with the cord on the opposite end. The Hawley's big stainless steel mouse ball resides at the wrist edge and communicates the x-y coordinate position to the cursor. Two small stainless steel balls serve as rollers on the cord end. The Hawley mouse motherboard looks akin to the Alto mouse's, but brightly colored, much prettier than the outside.

A patent filed by IBM in 1995 for a pointing device cites the Hawley: "Two different implementations of the mouse protocol unit 37 have been known. One involves quadrature signals (pulse trains) and is known as a parallel implementation. The parallel implementation was developed and manufactured by Hawley Laboratories of Berkeley, Calif." (Patent 5764219)

Hawley ads featuring the 1983 X063X mouse undoubtedly target engineers and military technicians, who were some of the earliest computer users. Hawley must also intend to challenge input devices produced by Koala and Mouse Systems for personal computers. One ad claims,

"the MOUSE HOUSE™ is superior to any other mouse made. Its combination of accuracy, speed, and ease of operation is impossible to attain with input devices such as touch tablets, light pens, or track balls." (Stanford Making the Macintosh)

Another ad states the specifications:

"The HAWLEY X063X Mouse moves the cursor in any direction on a computer display screen, in direct proportion to its own movement, with a resolution of 200 ppi. The user-friendly Mouse rolls freely on any convenient surface." (Stanford Making the Macintosh)

X063X Mouses

Three X063Xes featured here are distinctively colored, each has a tale:
'vanilla' Hawley mouse icon white with black buttons - serial no. 07305
'licorice' Hawley mouse icon black with white buttons & label - ser. no. 07350
'jellybeans' Hawley mouse icon black with tri-colored buttons - serial no. 10154
Related mouses:
Mystery mouse icon mystery mouse
DEC Hawley mouse icon Hawley DEC mouse
Three X063X flavors:
'vanilla' Hawley mouse icon vanilla
'licorice' Hawley mouse icon licorice
'jellybeans' Hawley mouse icon jelly beans


External Links:
Transparent Hawley mouse photos
Stanford: Making the Macintosh